It will probably not be an exaggeration if we say that Dragan Bjelogrlic has done more films than certain people can count the exact number of films they have seen in the movie theater. On that long list of successful roles this past decade he added a couple of production mega-projects, such as the series “The Storks Will Be Back” and “Montevideo”.

The first time he directed something was in the films and series “Montevideo, Taste of a Dream” and “See You in Montevideo”, while this year’s edition of “Manaki Brothers” promoted the pilot-episode of his new film series, “Black Sun”, whose cinematographer is Ivan Kostic.

“Black Sun” is consisted of 11 episodes, with a participation of around hundred actors and film professionals on creative positions. This film series belongs to the genre of historical thriller set at the end of the 1920’s in SCS (State of Slovenes, Croats and Serbs), where we are witnessing the interlacing of destinies of the “little people” and the big historical events and criminal conspiracies. In some of the episodes we can see the general Vrangel from the White Army, Russian cossacs, Serbian policemen, perverse officers and other high officials, court ladies and cheap prostitutes, opium smugglers and VMRO members, a combination that promises to awake interest in the audience.

Do you think that the future of the film industry in our region lies in the film series?

It will be nice if the future of the film industry is such. We will see, I hope so. The series “Black Sun” is something new in the industry, esthetically and production-wise speaking, and that is why I hope that we will have that future.

In your first film as a director, there was a controversial historical personality, Mustafa Golubic, who just happened to “stroll” through the story. As far as we could see in the pilot-episode of “Black Sun”, he will be one of the more significant characters?

Yes, yes, Golubic will have a very important role in “Black Sun”…

We are talking about the abundance of series in our region, but can they qualify as production revivals of the ex-Yugoslavian series such as “Hot Wind”, which had a high production profile?

The times have changed, every time carries its own rules. The series became a very important element in the film industry, becoming even more significant than the classic feature films, on the level of esthetics and productions. It will be nice if there was a more serious approach in our region, regardless of whether we’re speaking of historical or contemporary dramatic series. If we’re being smart, our film series will also be very successful.